3rd Friday Folk
Coffeehouse at the Carnegie

Carnegie Community Arts Center
107 North Main Street
Somerset, KY 42501

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3rd Friday Folk Coffeehouse at the Carnegie carries on the tradition of the American folk music venue by providing a listening space for artists and audiences to enjoy each other's company, music, and mutual encouragement.

Folk music has a broad definition, but remains centered in the traditional music brought to our shores by early immigrants - primarily from the British Isles - and filtered through the Appalachians to evolve into today's folk music.

In the 1960's just about every town in North America had a coffeehouse. Usually volunteer-run and held once a month, these were the musical breeding grounds for artists like Bob Dylan, Arlo Guthrie, Joan Baez, Don McLean, John Denver and so many others. Very often, the coffeehouses would be held in schools, church basements, clubs or even in living rooms.

Time moved on and the music scene changed, but the coffeehouses continued to present wonderful concerts. By the late 1980's and into the 90's artists like Suzanne Vega, Tracy Chapman, John Gorka, and Dar Williams cut their musical teeth in these small, hometown music venues.

The 3rd Friday Folk Coffeehouse at the Carnegie is our way of encouraging the resurgence of this musical tradition. Our mission is to present local, regional, and national touring folk musicians and songwriters, with an emphasis on roots music and its traditions.

Our monthly coffeehouse meets in the basement of the Carnegie Community Arts Center in Somerset, KY, on the third Friday each month*. The music goes from 7 to 9 PM.

Donation is $7.00, and reservations are suggested. To reserve a seat - call, email, or text.

Folk musicians interested is a possible booking, please call, email, or text a description of your music style and a website address.

* Schedule conflicts may move the concert to the 4th Friday.

 


Boogertown Gap is Ruth Barber and Keith Watson, a wife and husband duo whohey specialize in the music that was played and sung by early pioneers and settlers of the Great Smoky Mountains and vicinity.  Ever hear of Juliann Johnson, Pretty Little Widow, Cripple Creek, The Farmer's Curst Wife, Barbara Allen.. and so on?  Well, there's lots more of these tunes in their repertoire: old Celtic ballads, fiddle tunes, American compositions, Negro spirituals, and those ever present obscure unknown traditional tunes!!

Ruth and Keith currently reside in Pittman Center, TN, where they perform authentic Old-Time Mountain and Celtic Music throughout East Tennessee and the local "Great Smokies" area at a variety of events and functions. Sometimes they even travel to share this old music with other folks. 

They share a love of the nature, culture, and history of the Great Smoky Mountains and of the music of their ancestors and descendants who lived here and helped shape this mountain folk music (Keith's family has been in the Smokies for over 200 years).  They get their name from a local community in Sevier County where the Watson's settled in the late 1800's and early 1900's.

Their intention is to provide you enjoyment while listening to this Appalachian folk music and the folklore and stories that have shaped this antique, yet timeless form of music of the mountains.

Dwight Smith is a member of the Somerset Songwriters Group. He lives in Boone County, KY. His original songs are heartfelt vinettes of living and loving. He has a well-honed sense of humor, both in his songs and his stories.


 
©2014 3RD FRIDAY FOLK